Here are some tips to help you warm up without a campfire, whether you are hiking, or in a tent, or spending the early hours in the car.

When you are on the road
The first is the good news. Exercise—even if you just keep one foot in front of the other—helps maintain your body temperature. Unfortunately, the warmth may not extend to your fingers and toes. Continue to bend your fingers, but better yet, invest in some hand and toe heaters before you start. Yes, they do help, especially those chemicals that can generate heat.

You may also want to spend some money on your coat. Cheap coats and jackets usually cannot provide that much insulation. As long as you wear clothes suitable for the weather, don't wear cotton cloth under your coat. This kind of cloth can absorb heat from your body.

Before you start, help your inner melting pot with some high-fat and/or high-protein snacks, such as olive oil or peanut butter. Then eat something regularly on the way. Anything that contains calories will help, because calories are units of calories.

Even if it is not hot, ginger root tea can promote metabolism, but if you drink it in a thermos, the effect will be better. Whatever you do, when you stop to rest, don't sit on cold, hard ground or rocks. The cold will radiate directly to your body.

Tips for Staying Warm While Camping

Keep warm in the tent
Well, you successfully escaped to your camp. Now consider the location of your campground, it will determine whether you are freezing to death or quite comfortable.

Obviously, you want to hide yourself in a sheltered place-a forest should be fine. But try to avoid valleys and other low-lying areas. Remember, heat rises, cold sinks. You also need to stay away from water bodies, as this will cool the air.

You might think that after you finally camp, you should really drink a cup of hot palm wine, but drinking alcoholic beverages is not a good idea. Alcohol can make you dehydrated, and dehydration can lower your body temperature.

Now is the time to make sure you can sleep comfortably and stay warm until dawn. But first, do more exercise. Doing some aerobics before going to bed will warm you up before climbing into your sleeping bag, and your sleeping bag should do the rest, trapping the warmth in a cozy cocoon. But be careful, don’t overdo it and don’t sweat. Sweating will quickly cool you down again.

Speaking of sleeping bags, if you plan to camp in cold weather, you will want to spend extra money on a very good sleeping bag. Buy a bag that can withstand temperatures that are at least 10 to 20 degrees lower than you expect. If you can’t pay the extra cost, bring an extra blanket and put it on the sleeping bag while you sleep.

One of the best ways is to keep the heat source between the thighs, like a thermos. The arteries there help regulate the body's temperature. Remember that body heat will be dissipated from the head, so wearing a knitted hat while sleeping will also help.

Tips for Staying Warm While Camping

Bedding down in your vehicle
If you are going to spend the night in a car, most of the tips and tricks for keeping warm on the road or in a tent are equally effective, but your car or van can provide one or two additional options to increase your warmth.

Enclose the place where you sleep and isolate the place you don't use at night. You can use blankets or planks that you have brought from home-when you don’t need them, they can lie flat in the trunk or cargo area and take up minimal space. If you are really cold, you can drive the car for a while to release the heat. Just make sure that the exhaust pipe is not blocked, so that the exhaust pipe can go out, not inside, it can be fatal there.


Try some buddy heat
No matter where you are, the best calorie is body temperature, so if you get along well with your camping buddies, snuggle and share it.